PowerGUI 1.0.13 is now available

Yesterday PowerGUI 1.0.13 was made available for download on the PowerGUI community site.  Aside from the many great new features in PowerGUI and the PowerGUI Script Editor (which you can read about here on Richard Siddaway’s blog), I wanted to share some of the details about the enhancements and additions that were made in the area that I am responsible for in this release — the PowerPacks.  Here is a list of the changes that were included:

Local System PowerPack:

  • added description, startup type and logon account to the output properties on the services node
  • replaced hard-coded event log tree with dynamic tree that shows all event logs on the system (note: this doesn’t support the custom views that can be created in the Vista event log viewer yet)
  • added actions to clear all events in an event log, set the maximum size and set the overflow policy
  • updated the Drives node so that drives are automatically grouped by provider type when there are multiple drives on a system
  • fixed issues preventing the browsing of certain drives from working properly
  • added support for viewing the security descriptor and the access control list for files, directories and registry keys
  • added take ownership support for security descriptors
  • added Values link to view the values associated with a registry key and Change Value action to change a registry value
  • added support for an expanded view of environment variables that contain multiple values delimited by semi-colons
  • added open file support
  • added support for signing files from a certificate provider drive

Active Directory PowerPack:

  • replaced Browse the Domain node with Browse Active Directory node; this supports browsing all of Active Directory within PowerGUI, not just the Domain Naming Context node
  • added action to delete a computer object from AD
  • added Member Of (Recursive) links for groups, and computers
  • added Member Of link for users

WMI Browser PowerPack (new!):

  • introduced brand new PowerPack for browsing WMI objects on the local computer or remote computers
  • exposed support for managing specific computers via WMI; you just use the Add Connection and Remove Connection actions that are exposed through the root WMI Browser node
  • exposed all WMI objects on a computer; you just browse through the WMI object tree to the one you are looking for and then use the Get WMI Objects link to view the WMI objects of that class type

There is still a lot more to do with the PowerPacks and this is only the beginning.  I’m completely focused on enhancing the PowerPacks that come with PowerGUI, so if you have suggestions, requests, or feedback to offer, I’d be more than happy to hear it — just leave me a comment on this blog.  Or if you are trying to make a PowerPack yourself and want home help or suggestions, you can comment about that here too or just post about it on the PowerGUI Forums.

And if you haven’t downloaded PowerGUI 1.0.13 yet, please give it a try and let me know what you think!

Kirk out.

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2 thoughts on “PowerGUI 1.0.13 is now available

  1. Hiya Kirk,

    Great work,

    After a first look at you new WMI browser PowerPack, I wondered if it would be possible in PowerGUI to cache the enumerated namespaces as I do in my PowerShell WMI explorer , you version is faster as mine in the WMI explorer, as you do not use amended qualifiers, but still I think this would speed up the browser a lot, also you could then use amended qualifiers to also retrieve the descriptions / help info from WMI.

    /\/\o\/\/ out

    Like

  2. Hi Marc,

    Thanks for the great feedback!

    Caching the enumerated namespaces is absolutely the right thing to do. I just didn’t get it done for this first version, but will be looking at that for future releases. Also I’m new to use WMI itself to retrieve WMI help, but I have been researching how it works and it looks pretty straightforward so I intend to add that soon as well. And localized to boot!

    Kirk out.

    Like

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